In Fitting Fashion

A Pattern Fundamentals Design Project: Ava Part 7

 

Early this year I shared a 6 part Pattern Fundamentals video series that walked you through the process of creating a pattern design using your personal basic block pattern.

Did you participate in the Ava design project?

If you did, you may have come upon a bit of a stumbling block that I'd like to help you step over, so this week  I'm adding a Part 7 and answering a question that's come up quite a bit lately.

"What do I do when the bust dart volume isn't enough to create three neckline darts?"

If you stumbled at this stage, I have the answer for you today. Watch the video to learn exactly what to do.

If you missed the series and want to catch up use the links below to follow along!

A Pattern Fundamentals Design Project: Ava Part I

A Pattern Fundamentals Design Project: Ava Part 2

A Pattern Fundamentals Design Project: Ava Part 3

A Pattern Fundamentals Design Project: Ava Part 4

A Pattern Fundamentals Design Project: Ava Part 5

A Pattern Fundamentals Design Project:...

Continue Reading...

How to Find Invisible Darts on Pants

 

Last week we talked about invisible darts on bodice patterns. If you happened to miss that video tutorial, take a moment to go back and watch, I think you’ll find it an interesting perspective on the fitting elements that many sewing patterns contain.

This week, I’m expanding on the topic to share the invisible dart locations you’ll find on pant patterns.

Take a moment and watch the video, you may not have considered the fitting elements that I share inside. 

Get your pant scaled block patterns HERE.

Enjoy!

All My Best,
Alexandra

 

Continue Reading...

How to Find Invisible Darts

 

If you’re on my email list, you’ll know that last week I sent out a quick tip on visible and invisible darts. It spiked quite a bit of interest, so I decided to expand on the topic a bit with a supporting video tutorial so today I’m going to share some of the most common invisible dart locations and show you how you can discover their location on any pattern.

Let me show you how to set up your patterns in a way that will reveal even more examples of invisible darts.

Watch the video now for all the details.

Next week, I’ll share the invisible dart locations on pant patterns. Understanding their location might just help you get a better fit on your next pair. To get you started, visit my pant fitting video series and download the scaled pant block pattern.

If I've piqued your interest in the Fitting Essentials online course, you can get all the details HERE. Enrolment only opens once per year so sign up to the waiting list to be sure you don't miss your...

Continue Reading...

Quick Tips: Visible and Invisible Darts

This week I waned to share something that might get you thinking about darts a little differently.

In the image above you'll see two different kinds of darts represented: visible and invisible darts. I know you are familiar with visible darts, they are easily found and identified, but invisible darts can be a little bit more elusive because they are hidden inside the seams throughout the garment and give the garment shape just like the visible darts you're so familiar with.

In the example I've shown above you'll see that there is one invisible dart at the back yoke seam line which provides shaping for the back just as a shoulder dart would. Another invisible dart is located at the shoulder seam line which provides the shape you need over the shoulder.

When you consider shaping in the seams as darts, you can use the information to help you understand how to adjust your pattern to fit you. I invite you to take a closer look at your sewing patterns before you sew to discover all...

Continue Reading...

Fitting Knits: How to Make a Back Contour Adjustment on a T-Shirt Pattern

 

Last week we talked about bust adjustments on a t-shirt pattern, this week I'd like to address how to handle back contour shaping. Age and posture can take a toll on the body and sometimes can result in more rounded shoulders and back. In order to achieve a good and comfortable fit in your garments you'll likely need to make a pattern adjustment to accommodate this body shape so today we'll cover the upper-back and mid-back contour shape adjustments.

Watch the video now to see how it's done.

If you'd like to learn about stretch fabric pattern making, I invite you to look into my online course The Custom Stretch Knit Bodice. You'll learn how to draft a basic T-shirt using your own body measurements. I'll leave a link for you on this page.

If you're not interested in drafting your own T-Shirt I have a pattern you can use. It's called the Jenny Tee and you can find it at inhousepatterns.com. For more information about how the Jenny pattern fits take a look at this video: Fitting...

Continue Reading...

Fitting Knits: How to Make a Bust Adjustment on a T-Shirt Pattern

 

This week we're continuing with our fitting knits series so today I want to share some information you can use regarding bust adjustments. You'll find several bust adjustment tutorials on my website already but in this video I'll share some tips on how to translate that information to knit garments.

In order to create a good fit over the bust in any garment, the front pattern piece must be longer and wider than the back pattern piece. This extra length and width allows the garments balance lines  to hang level as the fabric travels over the projection of the bust. The resulting excess length at the side seam is then taken up as dart volume so that the front and back side seams can be made the same length and stitched together. 

In most knit patterns, the bust dart is eliminated due to the ability of the fabric to stretch and mold over the bust projection but if you are larger than a B cup or you prefer looser fitting styles, this isn't sufficient to achieve a good fit, so...

Continue Reading...

Fitting Knits: How to Determine the Negative Ease on the Jenny Tee

 

This month I've turned the focus to fitting knits. I have covered the topic to some extent previously so if you want more information on this topic, just click on the "fitting knits" category in the sidebar of the tutorial section of my website inhousepatternsstudio.com. If you're already on my website, just look to the right and you'll see the topic category there.

As you likely already know, I believe that understanding the balance of a garment on your body is the key to achieving good fit. I've shared this rather extensively in The Perfect Fit Guide as well as in all of my online courses and workshops. While I usually talk about this in relation to woven garments, it is a useful tool in assessing fit in knits as well, so last week I showed you how to find the balance lines on the In-House Patterns Jenny tee in the hope of helping you understand how to assess the fit of the pattern.

Since we've already determined the position of the balance lines on the pattern, I thought we could...

Continue Reading...

Fitting Knits: How to Find the Balance Lines on the Jenny Tee

 

If you're familiar with my fitting methods and have downloaded your copy of The Perfect Fit Guide, you already know that understanding the balance of the garment on your body is the key to making a pattern fit you. As a result I get asked this question all the time:

"How do I find the balance lines on a sewing pattern?"

I do give you some general guidelines about finding these important lines on other sewing patterns in this video but since we're talking about knits this month, let me show you how to find them on the In-House Patterns Jenny Tee.

I'd love for the Jenny Tee to be your go-to t-shirt pattern and I know achieving a perfect fit is the key to making that happen. If you already have a copy of the pattern, I hope you'll follow along because locating the balance lines on the pattern and transferring them to your sample will give you the guidance you need to assess the fit and solve any issues that may arise. Watch the video for all the details.

Next week we'll...

Continue Reading...

How to Determine Degree of Shoulder Slope

 

Last week I showed you how to determine the shoulder slope on a sewing pattern. If you missed it, you can watch it HERE.

This week you'll learn how to translate that information into your degree of shoulder slope using a long forgotten tool that I am pretty sure you'll find in your junk drawer or a family member's school supply kit.

Once you've determined your degree of shoulder slope you'll have all the information you need to transfer the information to any sewing pattern.

All My Best,
Alexandra

 

 

Continue Reading...

How to Determine the Shoulder Slope on a Pattern

 

This week I've got a really quick video that I hope you’ll find truly helpful.

It answers a question from Kelly who wanted to know how to measure her shoulder slope. A quick google search will give you several options. You can trace your shoulder line onto a piece of paper taped to the wall or use an iPhone app to determine the degree of slant. I personally haven’t found these to be very accurate because you usually need a helper to work with you, so I rely on the sample fit assessment to tell me what the shoulder slope should be.

Once you have a sample a garment that fits your shoulder angle, you can record that information for future use. So today I’m going to show you how to measure the shoulder slope on a pattern so that you can use the information for future sewing sewing projects.

Once you watch the video and understand how to measure the shoulder slope on a pattern you can convert this information to degrees if needed by using a protractor. To fuel...

Continue Reading...
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Close