In Fitting Fashion

Quick Tips: Visible and Invisible Darts

This week I waned to share something that might get you thinking about darts a little differently.

In the image above you'll see two different kinds of darts represented: visible and invisible darts. I know you are familiar with visible darts, they are easily found and identified, but invisible darts can be a little bit more elusive because they are hidden inside the seams throughout the garment and give the garment shape just like the visible darts you're so familiar with.

In the example I've shown above you'll see that there is one invisible dart at the back yoke seam line which provides shaping for the back just as a shoulder dart would. Another invisible dart is located at the shoulder seam line which provides the shape you need over the shoulder.

When you consider shaping in the seams as darts, you can use the information to help you understand how to adjust your pattern to fit you. I invite you to take a closer look at your sewing patterns before you sew to discover all...

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Fitting Knits: How to Make a Back Contour Adjustment on a T-Shirt Pattern

 

Last week we talked about bust adjustments on a t-shirt pattern, this week I'd like to address how to handle back contour shaping. Age and posture can take a toll on the body and sometimes can result in more rounded shoulders and back. In order to achieve a good and comfortable fit in your garments you'll likely need to make a pattern adjustment to accommodate this body shape so today we'll cover the upper-back and mid-back contour shape adjustments.

Watch the video now to see how it's done.

If you'd like to learn about stretch fabric pattern making, I invite you to look into my online course The Custom Stretch Knit Bodice. You'll learn how to draft a basic T-shirt using your own body measurements. I'll leave a link for you on this page.

If you're not interested in drafting your own T-Shirt I have a pattern you can use. It's called the Jenny Tee and you can find it at inhousepatterns.com. For more information about how the Jenny pattern fits take a look at this video: Fitting...

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Fitting Knits: How to Make a Bust Adjustment on a T-Shirt Pattern

 

This week we're continuing with our fitting knits series so today I want to share some information you can use regarding bust adjustments. You'll find several bust adjustment tutorials on my website already but in this video I'll share some tips on how to translate that information to knit garments.

In order to create a good fit over the bust in any garment, the front pattern piece must be longer and wider than the back pattern piece. This extra length and width allows the garments balance lines  to hang level as the fabric travels over the projection of the bust. The resulting excess length at the side seam is then taken up as dart volume so that the front and back side seams can be made the same length and stitched together. 

In most knit patterns, the bust dart is eliminated due to the ability of the fabric to stretch and mold over the bust projection but if you are larger than a B cup or you prefer looser fitting styles, this isn't sufficient to achieve a good fit, so...

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Fitting Knits: How to Determine the Negative Ease on the Jenny Tee

 

This month I've turned the focus to fitting knits. I have covered the topic to some extent previously so if you want more information on this topic, just click on the "fitting knits" category in the sidebar of the tutorial section of my website inhousepatternsstudio.com. If you're already on my website, just look to the right and you'll see the topic category there.

As you likely already know, I believe that understanding the balance of a garment on your body is the key to achieving good fit. I've shared this rather extensively in The Perfect Fit Guide as well as in all of my online courses and workshops. While I usually talk about this in relation to woven garments, it is a useful tool in assessing fit in knits as well, so last week I showed you how to find the balance lines on the In-House Patterns Jenny tee in the hope of helping you understand how to assess the fit of the pattern.

Since we've already determined the position of the balance lines on the pattern, I thought we could...

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Fitting Knits: How to Find the Balance Lines on the Jenny Tee

 

If you're familiar with my fitting methods and have downloaded your copy of The Perfect Fit Guide, you already know that understanding the balance of the garment on your body is the key to making a pattern fit you. As a result I get asked this question all the time:

"How do I find the balance lines on a sewing pattern?"

I do give you some general guidelines about finding these important lines on other sewing patterns in this video but since we're talking about knits this month, let me show you how to find them on the In-House Patterns Jenny Tee.

I'd love for the Jenny Tee to be your go-to t-shirt pattern and I know achieving a perfect fit is the key to making that happen. If you already have a copy of the pattern, I hope you'll follow along because locating the balance lines on the pattern and transferring them to your sample will give you the guidance you need to assess the fit and solve any issues that may arise. Watch the video for all the details.

Next week we'll...

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How to Determine Degree of Shoulder Slope

 

Last week I showed you how to determine the shoulder slope on a sewing pattern. If you missed it, you can watch it HERE.

This week you'll learn how to translate that information into your degree of shoulder slope using a long forgotten tool that I am pretty sure you'll find in your junk drawer or a family member's school supply kit.

Once you've determined your degree of shoulder slope you'll have all the information you need to transfer the information to any sewing pattern.

All My Best,
Alexandra

 

 

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How to Determine the Shoulder Slope on a Pattern

 

This week I've got a really quick video that I hope you’ll find truly helpful.

It answers a question from Kelly who wanted to know how to measure her shoulder slope. A quick google search will give you several options. You can trace your shoulder line onto a piece of paper taped to the wall or use an iPhone app to determine the degree of slant. I personally haven’t found these to be very accurate because you usually need a helper to work with you, so I rely on the sample fit assessment to tell me what the shoulder slope should be.

Once you have a sample a garment that fits your shoulder angle, you can record that information for future use. So today I’m going to show you how to measure the shoulder slope on a pattern so that you can use the information for future sewing sewing projects.

Once you watch the video and understand how to measure the shoulder slope on a pattern you can convert this information to degrees if needed by using a protractor. To fuel...

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How to Eliminate a Bust Dart

 

This week’s video is a response to a special request from Linda who recently under went a double mastectomy. Since she still wants to sew the vintage patterns she’s collected over the years, she’d like to know how to reduce or eliminate the bust dart on a pattern. I’m going to answer Linda’s query by sharing a tutorial that can reduce or eliminate the dart volume in a way that you’ve likely not seen before. 

Watch the video to learn how.

While the method I shared here resulted in a reduction or removal of the bust dart volume, it does not change the front waist and hip measurement like the regular small bust adjustment which makes it likely to work for people like Linda who have chosen not to wear a prosthesis after their surgery.  As with all adjustments, you may need to experiment to some degree to customize the pattern to your body.

If you enjoyed this video, you might be interesting in joining me in Fitting Essentials. Fitting...

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Exciting News! [Meet Molly]

 

We've added a new member to the In-House Patterns team! Watch the video to meet Molly and learn about the role she'll play in the future of In-House Patterns.

Here are Molly's details:

Height: 5'6" (167 cm)
Bust: 45" (114cm)
Cup Size C
Waist 38" (96.5cm)
Hip 48" (122 cm)
Shoulder Width 15 1/2" (39 cm)
Across Back 15" (38 cm)
Across Front 14" (35.5cm)
Bicep Girth 15" (38 cm)
CB Neck to Waist 15 3/4" (40 cm)
CB Waist to Hip 8 1/2" (21.5 cm)

Here are Maureen's Details:

Height: 5'8" (172 cm)
Bust: 36" (91.5cm)
Cup Size B
Waist 28 1/2" (72 cm)
Hip 38 1/2" (98 cm)
Shoulder Width 15" (38 cm)
Across Back 14" (35.5 cm)
Across Front 13.5" (34 cm)
Bicep Girth 11" (28 cm)
CB Neck to Waist 16 1/4" (41 cm)
CB Waist to Hip 8" (20 cm)

For the current In-House Patterns Sizing Chart CLICK HERE. Shop for patterns while you're there! The sizing chart for the new sizing category will be coming soon.

If you want to learn more about Molly's on-boarding process check out her highlights on Instagram HERE. I'll continue to...

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What You'll Learn from the Pattern Measurements

 

You probably already know that pattern companies usually supply a few finished pattern measurements on the outside of the pattern envelope. These usually include hem widths and total back length. These serve to give you some idea of the basic dimensions of the finished garment but are rarely very helpful in determining how the pattern will fit you.

You might have more luck by looking inside the pattern envelope. Often you’ll find the finished pattern measurements for the bust, waist and hip girth on the sewing pattern pieces themselves. These are the measurements that will actually help you understand how the pattern will fit. 

Let me share just a few things you can  learn if you are willing to spend a little bit more time with the pattern pieces.

We already know finished pattern measurements for the bust waist and hip can often be found on the pattern pieces but I want you to be a little bit cautious here because I have found that often the printed measurements are...

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